Monday, January 07, 2008

Here’s where I am with the gansey. I feel slightly more hopeful about the size – not only will cables constrain it, but the whole pattern is essentially a rib. If it’s close to size, I could always knit it an inch or two short, and lengthen (and therefore narrow) it at the blocking stage. We shall soon see.



As we shall in New Hampshire. The British press has always been keen on Obama, although regarding Hillary as inevitable. Since she lost that quality in Iowa last week, they have all but skipped ahead to Obama’s inauguration. My sister phoned yesterday; we had a nice New Year’s conversation, largely devoted to politics. She’s far less maniacally devoted to Obama than I am, but not hostile.

What we need is a contribution from Theo to his family blog, with the insider’s view of what is going on. Perhaps later in the week, huh? British readers, at the very least, would be enthralled.

Here are some pictures from our holiday:

Christmas Day in the morning… And me and Thomas-the-Elder, at our family lunch on the 28th...


(Scanty) details in this morning’s paper make it less likely that the woman who died in Kirkmichael (see yesterday) was related to the people who pushed us out of our driveway on Friday. It is, paradoxically, a relief.

8 comments:

  1. I too feel relieved that the woman that was found is not related to the people who helped you in the snow.

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  2. Political news from New Hampshire - I talked with my sister yesterday and asked about voting preferences in her New Hampshire family. She and most of her family members are voting for Edwards, one dissenting voice is going for Clinton. She didn't even mention Obama - unlike Sky and BBC news.

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  3. Sister Helen3:09 PM

    You underestimate me. We have been giving Obama money from the beginning--very unusual for us.
    The news, at least, and the polls, are very positive about his chances in New Hampshire. And our press is full of wary African Americans saying "maybe he really can do it and I should vote for him." He was calm and, well, presidential, in the debate. It's very early days which is why you need to keep knitting but we're hopeful.
    I agree with Janet that it's reassuring that there was no link between you and the death in the snow.

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  4. Sister Helen3:10 PM

    You underestimate me. We have been giving Obama money from the beginning--very unusual for us.
    The news, at least, and the polls, are very positive about his chances in New Hampshire. And our press is full of wary African Americans saying "maybe he really can do it and I should vote for him." He was calm and, well, presidential, in the debate. It's very early days which is why you need to keep knitting but we're hopeful.
    I agree with Janet that it's reassuring that there was no link between you and the death in the snow.

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  5. HAPPY NEW YEAR. I have been watching every thing about Obama with a bigger passion than normally since I now know him from knitting blogs and keep thinking about the sock somebody made him carry. Especially since I saw a big audience of people wearing knitted hats watching on widescreen in NH. And as there is so many knitters in the US there may be hope for him. Now the big problem is whether one should hope for a woman or a afro-american man in office.

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  6. Hmm, which minority is more likely to win the US Presidency - woman or African-American? Difficult call.

    Nice to finally see a photo of you, and wearing a handknit too : P

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  7. The polls are interesting - Obama at 38%, Hillary down in the lower 20's and Edwards at 18%. Then again, the polls were wrong in Iowa. The press in the US seems to be taking it for granted that Obama is going to take NH - the big question seems to be whether Hillary is going to drop out of the race if she comes in 3rd in NH like she did in Iowa. Tomorrow is going to be an interesting day.

    The gansey is looking good!

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  8. Jean,

    I'm de-lurking to tell you how much I enjoy reading your post. Growing up, I lived across the street from a family from Edinburgh. I learned to knit from her "Granny Pat" (an amazing woman), and learned to love bagpipe music from listening to her husband's band practice on their front lawn. I miss those days.

    Glad to hear there's no connection between your good samaritans and the poor dead woman. That would be a bit too uncomfortable, had there been.

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