Monday, March 25, 2013


A perfectly satisfactory Palm Sunday, with no flooding. The cathedral congregation is undiminished by recent scandals, and it turns out we still have a perfectly good bishop, who was on hand. He was appointed as an auxiliary a year ago – the Cardinal has not been in good health lately.

Sundays are always tough, and the Palm Sunday Mass is a long one. My husband’s blood sugar was low when we finally left and proceeded towards the bus stop in ragged array. I was determined to hail a taxi if one went past. Some people we had never spoken to before, but often seen, the way one does in a large church, offered us a lift.

They were parked right in front of the cathedral because they had Disabled badges, both of them, separately, although both were far spryer than my husband. They were an answer to a prayer yesterday, literally.

Blogs

Jared has put up some more of his pictures from Iceland (no knitting). I was surprised to see the trees. I must look at a map. How can Iceland have trees when Shetland doesn’t?

And Liz Lovick’s northern pics are always good (again, no knitting). I’m sure those seaweed-fed sheep are delicious.

Comments

I was glad to hear that so many of you positively prefer to comment anonymously – it makes all this tedious deleting worthwhile. It is indeed a puzzle, what the spammers are up to. The topics of the websites one is meant to click on to are very wide-ranging: dog training, weight loss, porn sites, fitted kitchens, everything. Penis-enhancement occasionally crops up, but it is no longer the obsession it was a few years ago.

Knitting

I’m still on target to finish the second sleeve of the Relax tomorrow. That will leave only the neck edge stitches to be picked up, six rows of st st to be knit (I get my st st roll at last) and the bind off. But it’s probably better to leave that whole process until later, if I want it to be blocked and tried-on at the weekend. 

I must begin to get knitting together for that weekend, too: remind myself about sock sizes (notes on that subject are anchored here on my desktop machine); pack the Pakokku, in hopes of finishing the current socks;  pack the left-overs from Ed’s Gardening Sweater. I had an idea once that there was a size adjustment I could make on the spot if we weren’t satisfied with fit. What could it have been? Altering the arm-length, possibly, could be done in a weekend.

(If I surreptitiously installed Evernote on my husband’s new Toshiba, I could add the whole sock-size page from Lotus Organizer. It’s a thought. Just until I solve the OS problem and can have Evernote on the iPad.)

I have ordered Berocco 5 with the Anhinga pattern from Loop, thanks to the Foggy Knitter. If it comes promptly, as is quite likely, I can take it along at the weekend and see what Hellie and Lizzie think. Even in my post-Lenten state I fear I have far too much tummy for an Anhinga.

8 comments:

  1. When I visited Orkney a decade or so ago, I was told that the meat of the seaweed-eating sheep breeds is decidedly salty tasting.

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  2. THe seaweed fed sheep (or lambs) sound as if they would be good - isn't there a french pre-sale lamb from a coastal area? It reminds me of the obituary you posted - I really enjoyed it. If we were sitting over a cider somewhere I'd tell you my road kill story, but lord knows what the spammers would make of it. It did involve corn-fed deer.

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    1. I have a feeling that there is a similar Welsh delicacy, too. As for saltiness, perhaps a nice soothing onion sauce would add the necessary sweet note. I'm glad you read Alastair Robertson.

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  3. Gerri1:50 PM

    I do not log in with my google account or anything else and do not have to reply anonymously. I just put my name in and all I put in is my first name, sometimes with location if I feel like it. I skip the URL part.

    Iceland had trees until they kept cutting them for firewood. Intentional replanting began again in fairly recent times, ~1990. People still careful harvest the downed trees that wash up in the fjords.

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  4. Anhinga looks like a good choice for you. Interesting shaping, and Norah Gaughn is a good reliable designer. It looks really lovely in the Berocco yarn. As we get older, it seems we lose the defined waistline no matter how we work at it :(.

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  5. did you know that you can use EVERNOTE in a browser? just open whatever browser is on the iPad (will chrome work? ) and go to evernote.com and do the WEB SIGN IN (its in tiny green letters on the top right of the page). As long as your local evernote copy is synched up to the web servers (you can adjust that setting in the local copy on your computer under TOOLS\Options.

    Also Chrome has an extension and an app for Evernote - the extension is a clipper that lets you clip from any website and the app opens the web version.

    Evernote is my top app in my life - truly.

    Trees - am reading the CLEEVES Shetland Quartet - actually devouring it - and at some point she mentions that the islands were once covered with trees but are now barren. dont remember if she gives a reason but dont think.. maybe to make more grazeable land for sheep? interesting to figure out

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    1. That's a useful reminder, about Evernote. I used Dropbox that way on the unlamented Surface -- I could reach it with the browser, and download files one at a time. And did.

      As for trees, the ones in the Icelandic cemetery Jared showed us looked natural, the sort of weed-trees that will appear on fallow land as long as it isn't grazed. I had always assumed that the climate on Shetland was so hostile to trees that that didn't happen. This needs further investigation. I don't entirely trust Cleeves.

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  6. I'm perfectly happy to fully log in as "me" on a comment. However, some of the blog engines make you really fight to log in, trying it 3-4 times before you are successful. After that, some folks may just say anonymous is good enough!

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